View Full Version : have any of you guys heard of kermit cintron?


AntonTheMeh
10-16-2007, 11:36 PM
if so how well do you think he would do in the ufc?[he use to be a high school wrestler for folks that didn't know]

TBEC2
10-17-2007, 12:16 AM
yea i kno who he is as well as im aware of his views on MMA i mean i wrestled state in high school and my 1st day of jujitsu class still got introduced to the sport in a hard way. So sporting anything less than a national title or high really dont mean much. But the guys got really good hands i think he'll do alright if he trains properly.

nodogoshi
10-17-2007, 02:15 AM
yea i kno who he is as well as im aware of his views on MMA i mean i wrestled state in high school and my 1st day of jujitsu class still got introduced to the sport in a hard way. So sporting anything less than a national title or high really dont mean much. But the guys got really good hands i think he'll do alright if he trains properly.

I disagree.. I was a state placer in highschool, and sure Jujitsu was a little tough at first, but once you learn not to bull in with your neck unprotected and what not, wrestling translates very well into Jujitsu. Just takes a little submission defense, thats all. Wrestlers learn to move on the mat very well, which is a skill many jujitsu guys don't possess, along with takedowns. Jujitsu guys learn to lay on there backs way to much, which is fine in a submissions match, but can make for a true assbeating when strikes are added. I can't stand to see a guy constantly pull gaurd in an MMA fight.. thats often how beatdowns happen.

TBEC2
10-17-2007, 12:20 PM
I disagree.. I was a state placer in highschool, and sure Jujitsu was a little tough at first, but once you learn not to bull in with your neck unprotected and what not, wrestling translates very well into Jujitsu. Just takes a little submission defense, thats all. Wrestlers learn to move on the mat very well, which is a skill many jujitsu guys don't possess, along with takedowns. Jujitsu guys learn to lay on there backs way to much, which is fine in a submissions match, but can make for a true assbeating when strikes are added. I can't stand to see a guy constantly pull gaurd in an MMA fight.. thats often how beatdowns happen.

yea that was the hardest thing to adjust to, every time i was on my back i felt as tho i was losing i guess it was programed in my brain already. also i kept flatting my opponents out at the biceps which left me open to arm bars and triangles. Your right in a sense that the transition was smooth in terms of rolling but in terms of submission defense and set ups i was always trying to power through everything. My brother in law who wrestled for a D3 school and now fights MMA still has a hard time dealing with top submission grappler's its just its so hard to get the things that worked in wrestling out of ur brain.

nodogoshi
10-17-2007, 01:41 PM
yea that was the hardest thing to adjust to, every time i was on my back i felt as tho i was losing i guess it was programed in my brain already. also i kept flatting my opponents out at the biceps which left me open to arm bars and triangles. Your right in a sense that the transition was smooth in terms of rolling but in terms of submission defense and set ups i was always trying to power through everything. My brother in law who wrestled for a D3 school and now fights MMA still has a hard time dealing with top submission grappler's its just its so hard to get the things that worked in wrestling out of ur brain.

Its true that there's a lot of bad habits that have to be broken, but Jujitsu is overrated. It is one aspect to the game, and by no means a complete style of fighting. I was training at a strictly Jujitsu gym under a blackbealt before I came to Korea (not my first experience with Jujitsu, mind you) the ****s nicknamed me "agro" because I would throw there ass all over the place and they'd get frustrated, and tell me "I was doing it wrong." Well, **** that ****, if it works it works. They were really just pissed that they were getting beat by a wrestler who'd just entered the ****ing dojo. Needless to say, I decided the place did not suit me and I moved on.

I did Judo for a while as well, before this, and heard the same bull****, however luckily my Sensei was an experienced guy who recognized that I fought effectively and he promoted me based on merit alone.. I won all my competitions (except my first one) and recieved a brown bealt in 6 months. I also won my first brown belt tourny, in Sacramento, and took 2nd at the state games of Oregon shortly thereafter.

Jujitsu is necessary, but also very overrated.. the result of a succesfull marketing campaign by the Gracies, who in fact were the ones that founded the UFC, essentially as a showcase for their style. Sure there are plenty of very good Jujitsu fighters out they, but they train soo ****ing much to obtain such a level of fighting prowess. Not a knock on those fighters who's style is based on Jujitsu, but the good ones learn to diversify... and that is why they are good. Little nog. recently placed 3rd at the Panam Games in boxing, for ****s sake. Same goes for wrestlers as well.. just look how much Olympian Dan Henderson's striking has improved through the years. You simply cannot be good at only one style any more, and expect to make it to the top.

TBEC2
10-17-2007, 11:32 PM
Its true that there's a lot of bad habits that have to be broken, but Jujitsu is overrated. It is one aspect to the game, and by no means a complete style of fighting. I was training at a strictly Jujitsu gym under a blackbealt before I came to Korea (not my first experience with Jujitsu, mind you) the ****s nicknamed me "agro" because I would throw there ass all over the place and they'd get frustrated, and tell me "I was doing it wrong." Well, **** that ****, if it works it works. They were really just pissed that they were getting beat by a wrestler who'd just entered the ****ing dojo. Needless to say, I decided the place did not suit me and I moved on.

I did Judo for a while as well, before this, and heard the same bull****, however luckily my Sensei was an experienced guy who recognized that I fought effectively and he promoted me based on merit alone.. I won all my competitions (except my first one) and recieved a brown bealt in 6 months. I also won my first brown belt tourny, in Sacramento, and took 2nd at the state games of Oregon shortly thereafter.

Jujitsu is necessary, but also very overrated.. the result of a succesfull marketing campaign by the Gracies, who in fact were the ones that founded the UFC, essentially as a showcase for their style. Sure there are plenty of very good Jujitsu fighters out they, but they train soo ****ing much to obtain such a level of fighting prowess. Not a knock on those fighters who's style is based on Jujitsu, but the good ones learn to diversify... and that is why they are good. Little nog. recently placed 3rd at the Panam Games in boxing, for ****s sake. Same goes for wrestlers as well.. just look how much Olympian Dan Henderson's striking has improved through the years. You simply cannot be good at only one style any more, and expect to make it to the top.

LOL first off i think u made a smart choice in leaving that BJJ school that told you that you were doing things wrong because you were flexing the cats. Where i train (although it is a Gracie school) we got guys of all backgrounds from wrestling to sambo, and they loved it when i went in there trying to use freestyle on them it gave them more diversity to work with. I agree totally about not being one dimensional and some styles are over rated as well as some are under rated.

Back to Cintron, to me MMA is a 60/40 sport 60 metal preparation and 40 physical. How he would fair up in the sport is entirely up to him.

nodogoshi
10-18-2007, 12:59 AM
LOL first off i think u made a smart choice in leaving that BJJ school that told you that you were doing things wrong because you were flexing the cats. Where i train (although it is a Gracie school) we got guys of all backgrounds from wrestling to sambo, and they loved it when i went in there trying to use freestyle on them it gave them more diversity to work with. I agree totally about not being one dimensional and some styles are over rated as well as some are under rated.

Back to Cintron, to me MMA is a 60/40 sport 60 metal preparation and 40 physical. How he would fair up in the sport is entirely up to him.

What it comes down to is the athletes, really. Cintron has good potential, but its impossible to say how good he would do without seeing him fight.. and it also largely depends on what type of training he would undergo as well. Jeremy Williams, for instance recently had about 3 MMA fights, and won them all, one by choke I believe. The guys he was fighting were not top notch, and one had him in danger with a subbmission at one point, but it happens.. he mostly dominated them (i believe the video's are on Youtube). Williams was a state champion wrestler in HS, and is a blackbelt in judo.. in fact, there's also a video on youtube of him sparring LL, Lewis was fouling, and Williams judo throws him twice. I might dig the vids up later. But thats one example of a boxer crossing over and doing ok, though its essential to diversify your game. WBC champ Injin Chi recently announced his intention to begin a career in MMA as well.

As I said, Little Nog. recently took third at the panam games in boxing, and he also won the South American Championships.. thus, he may be contending for gold at the olympics!! And that from a guy long regarded as one of the top Jujitsu guys! Just a testament to the fact that these guys are all great athletes, and all have a chance to go far in whatever they choose to pursue.

Consider this: What if Floyd Mayweather would have been trained in MMA his whole life instead of boxing?? No way to say, but my guess is he'd be among the sport's very best right now. I say this because he is obviously a top notch athlete and fighter, there's no doubt about it. Not a plea that he shoulda been an MMA fighter, just saying that these sports are about the athletes, and it is their individual talents that make these sports what they are. So, I would say the Cintron would have great potential, and his success in boxing is very much a testament to that, in terms of his athletic and martial prowess.