View Full Version : Is boxing worth the strength loss??


RonnieCOleman
09-09-2007, 02:15 AM
I don't know how many of you have a solid weightlifting background, but I just want your opinion...is boxing really worth losing all the hard earned strength that you gained in the gym?? reason I'm asking is cuz ever since I started losing weight through boxing and running, my strengths been decreasing even though I've been trying to maintain it through strength training sessions. I feel more fitter and stronger in a different sense, but it's getting harder to reflect that when I'm hitting the weights. I'm not thinking of quitting or anything like that, but I just want some opinions from guys like verse or anyone else.

Southpaw16
09-09-2007, 02:20 AM
Well that really depends on the person. If weightlifting and pure strength training is what you love to do, and that is your real passion, then maybe you should stick to that. Myself, I love boxing, and that is what I want to be as good at as possible.

Boxing will however give you better all around conditioning than just weightlifting. It will give you speed, agility, stamina, and might actually improve your explosive strength. It depends which you like better, being as good as possible at beating people up in a fist fight? or lifting the most weight possible? Every person is different.

renren40
09-09-2007, 02:26 AM
I don't know how many of you have a solid weightlifting background, but I just want your opinion...is boxing really worth losing all the hard earned strength that you gained in the gym?? reason I'm asking is cuz ever since I started losing weight through boxing and running, my strengths been decreasing even though I've been trying to maintain it through strength training sessions. I feel more fitter and stronger in a different sense, but it's getting harder to reflect that when I'm hitting the weights. I'm not thinking of quitting or anything like that, but I just want some opinions from guys like verse or anyone else.


well i battle with this everyday...i lift weights but i have to run for cardio...
i think the best advice is to do both and if you do you have to realize that you will eat humble pie for a while cuz if u spar u might be slower from lifting...or u might be weaker on the bench...it is possible to maintain both power and boxing stamina...the key is raise your intensity level when your feeling weak and use cheat reps in cardio and weights....and you will have to load up on supplements...nothing illegal...just eat a lot and drink a lot...and when it is time to perform either in the ring or at a powerlifting contest...then sacrifice in the area that is not primary only for about 2 weeks...

Run
09-09-2007, 02:27 AM
I don't really see a problem.

How big are you........really? Because if you're stacked full of lean mass or something like a stereotypical body builder, there could be a problem. That mass is really useless and just tires and slows you down.

But I don't see a problem with having some muscle that you put on from lifting weights 2-4 times a week. I think the problem arises when you take the muscle building to the extreme.

Plus If you're serious about boxing I don't know how you'd make time to fit in a freeweight routine. You have to do roadwork, spar, work bags, bodyweight excersises name it.

renren40
09-09-2007, 02:28 AM
Well that really depends on the person. If weightlifting and pure strength training is what you love to do, and that is your real passion, then maybe you should stick to that. Myself, I love boxing, and that is what I want to be as good at as possible.

Boxing will however give you better all around conditioning than just weightlifting. It will give you speed, agility, stamina, and might actually improve your explosive strength. It depends which you like better, being as good as possible at beating people up in a fist fight? or lifting the most weight possible? Every person is different.


good point...you also have to think about your sweetheart...does she want a muscleman that's also a minute man or a thin man that can win man?!

cardio is vital for the goodies...

RonnieCOleman
09-09-2007, 02:32 AM
good point...you also have to think about your sweetheart...does she want a muscleman that's also a minute man or a thin man that can win man?!

cardio is vital for the goodies...

haha yeah you got a point there, didn't really think about that.

RonnieCOleman
09-09-2007, 02:38 AM
I don't really see a problem.

How big are you........really? Because if you're stacked full of lean mass or something like a stereotypical body builder, there could be a problem. That mass is really useless and just tires and slows you down.

But I don't see a problem with having some muscle that you put on from lifting weights 2-4 times a week. I think the problem arises when you take the muscle building to the extreme.

Plus If you're serious about boxing I don't know how you'd make time to fit in a freeweight routine. You have to do roadwork, spar, work bags, bodyweight excersises name it.


I don't really care about building muscle as long as I can get stronger and maintain that strength. I'm not really what you would call the stereotypical bodybuilder, just someone who has a decent level of strength at most. I normally strength train once or twice a week, while going to boxing rest of the time, I just want to know if it's possible to still be strong while devoting most of your time to boxing. I know guys like bernard hopkins and roy jones jr. can probably bench atleast over 2 plates and squat 3 plates or more, since they spend all their time doing boxing training and less weight lifting. I'd be happy if I could still keep that base level (2 plate or so bench, 3 plate or so squat) of strength. Just want to know if it's possible though?

Verstyle
09-09-2007, 02:47 AM
**** a strength loss.I rather get hoes with the rep of knocking mother ****ers out rather then get it from a damn bench press.What if someone messes with her at a bar? What are you going to do? Press him like the Ultimate Warrior?

Run
09-09-2007, 02:48 AM
I don't really care about building muscle as long as I can get stronger and maintain that strength. I'm not really what you would call the stereotypical bodybuilder, just someone who has a decent level of strength at most. I normally strength train once or twice a week, while going to boxing rest of the time, I just want to know if it's possible to still be strong while devoting most of your time to boxing. I know guys like bernard hopkins and roy jones jr. can probably bench atleast over 2 plates and squat 3 plates or more, since they spend all their time doing boxing training and less weight lifting. I'd be happy if I could still keep that base level (2 plate or so bench, 3 plate or so squat) of strength. Just want to know if it's possible though?

In my opinion? I think you should stick to your strength routine.

If you like/enjoy lifting freeweights and you like your strength.........I don't see a reason to quit lifting. Here are the pro's and con's.

Pro's of sticking to conventional boxing circuit without freeweights:

1. You'll be faster.

2. You'll have more stamina.

3. You might hit harder, because your hands will get faster.

Con's of sticking to conventional boxing circuit without freeweights:

1. You might not be as self confident.

2. You might have trouble imposing that strength in a clinch.

3. Chicks dig muscle to a certain extent.

DA1CATAS
09-09-2007, 09:15 AM
**** a strength loss.I rather get hoes with the rep of knocking mother ****ers out rather then get it from a damn bench press.What if someone messes with her at a bar? What are you going to do? Press him like the Ultimate Warrior?

lol

Thats what I'd do:banana:

platinummatt!
09-09-2007, 09:36 AM
Versatile he didn't mention girls. And apart from the situation you mentioned and maybe in the ring are chicks really gonna dig that? If I came home at night and told my chick how Id busted up 3 guys that day and she got all excited, Id be worried. And it may very well be time to look for a new girlfriend.


It's probably best to just stick with what you enjoy. I'm sure you can do both but one may suffer

BrooklynBomber
09-09-2007, 10:41 AM
LOl, you don't lose strength in boxing.


Your bench press numbers might go down(due to dieting/losing weight, not boxing) but your functional strength will be with you.

potatoes
09-09-2007, 03:25 PM
I don't know how many of you have a solid weightlifting background, but I just want your opinion...is boxing really worth losing all the hard earned strength that you gained in the gym?? reason I'm asking is cuz ever since I started losing weight through boxing and running, my strengths been decreasing even though I've been trying to maintain it through strength training sessions. I feel more fitter and stronger in a different sense, but it's getting harder to reflect that when I'm hitting the weights. I'm not thinking of quitting or anything like that, but I just want some opinions from guys like verse or anyone else.



The so called "strength" you gain by lifting weights is largely artificial and temporary. No amount of "strength" training will increase your speed nor your boxing skill nor your punching power potential. During the course of traditional boxing training the "strength" you obtain is natural and enduring. Boxing is not about strength, it is about hitting and not getting hit. It does not matter how strong the man is in front of you, if he can't hit you, he can't hurt you. Billy Conn didn't need to be as strong as Joe Louis to give him a boxing lesson. It was only after he got the silly idea he could give Louis a punching lesson that he got knockout out!

BrooklynBomber
09-09-2007, 03:28 PM
In fact, you will most likely become stronger. Your deadlift(the best strength indicator in weight lifting) will go up due to changes in neural charge.

batista
09-09-2007, 11:41 PM
The so called "strength" you gain by lifting weights is largely artificial and temporary. No amount of "strength" training will increase your speed nor your boxing skill nor your punching power potential

It won't increase boxing skill, but can certainly improve punching power and speed. There have been russian scientififc tests that have proved it on boxers and martial artists. I will try too find the material today some time.

Southpaw16
09-09-2007, 11:58 PM
In fact, you will most likely become stronger. Your deadlift(the best strength indicator in weight lifting) will go up due to changes in neural charge.

clean and jerk is the best strength indicator in weight lifting in my opinion. that might also go up as a result of boxing.

ForemanCrossArm
09-10-2007, 01:25 AM
I really don't understand this strength loss.. I would think that most fighters are abnormally strong for their weights, so maybe you're losing strength if you're losing weight. But think about it like this, you're losing you base and anything that loses weight at the base becomes weaker. It's a fact of physics, life, science, math, all that ****.

shawn_
09-10-2007, 02:06 AM
These Russian scientific tests wouldn't happen to be from rocky 4 would they?

BmoreBrawler
09-10-2007, 02:15 AM
good thread dude, the question for me is this(I cant fight anymore due to injury so I just do it to stay in shape):

I can do weightlifting, get buff and therefore mad *****es, or do boxing workouts, have more fun, and still function playing bball, but way less women.

SpeedKillz
09-10-2007, 09:42 AM
i weight lifted alot some years back when boxing was on the back burner for various reasons. i lifted 5-6 days a week for 2+ years and at a weight of 177 i benched 315 once for a max. then i stopped liftin and went back to full out boxing training. at a weight of 165 i benched 325 for a max once. no bull****.
if ur trainin ur ass of wit boxing - bags, pads, sparring, floorwork, med ball, etc. u will get way way stronger, losing weight or not, pound for pound u will be much strronger than the average weight lifter. i dono bout u, but i would rather be strong as a bull, then jus look strong as a bull.

yea everywhere i go everyone is always hangin off the meatheads dick, cuz they scared of him and all the girls are all over him and ****, but put that cat outside in the streets with me, and he'll jus be another meatball.....

boxing is the greatest workout in the world, period. but u CAN lift weights and box and be a fast, strong, powerful machine.

danny stash
09-10-2007, 10:38 AM
I was 235-238 muscle bound before boxing. I am now 218 and thinner and not nearly as "bench" strong and have smaller muscles but think I am stronger in every sense of the word. I can run 5 miles without dying of exhaustion and shin splints, I can go more than one round on the bag. I can run jump and punch faster and I have more energy. The initial muscle loss sucked but I got over it and I now embrace my more athletic body.

BrooklynBomber
09-10-2007, 02:48 PM
Well, here is the thing, to become really strong, and I mean strong in every sense of this word, weightlifting is not enough. Especially the type of weightlifting most people do, which is more hypertrophy lifting(get buff) then power lifting. So, since there is a lack of o-lifts(olympic lifts) on most of people's programs, their muscle don't generate much strength due to lack of use of motoric units(yes, there is a pool of motoric units in your muscles which are the actual strength). Boxing, on the other hand, activates much more motoric units within less amount of muscle. So, with boxing, you get more from less.

ForemanCrossArm
09-10-2007, 06:03 PM
These Russian scientific tests wouldn't happen to be from rocky 4 would they?

haha.. you know.. there is this book from either the very early 90's/late-80's that talks about how the russians were so good at training their athletes for the olympics and ****. a very interesting read, even if the actual workouts and such are common place today.

Exige Jr
09-10-2007, 06:16 PM
Strength is the ability to recruit as many muscle fibres at the same time, to carry out a task. Nothing to do with the size of the muscle. Although there may be a correlation between muscle size and fibres recruited... then again there may not.

Your strength lies in your nervous system.

Peterp
09-11-2007, 04:03 AM
I just don't understand the obsession with excessive muscle size

I promise you, 90% of women prefer a guy with the physique of Roy Jones Jnr over a guy with the physique of Ronnie Coleman

Kayo
09-11-2007, 02:38 PM
i weight lifted alot some years back when boxing was on the back burner for various reasons. i lifted 5-6 days a week for 2+ years and at a weight of 177 i benched 315 once for a max. then i stopped liftin and went back to full out boxing training. at a weight of 165 i benched 325 for a max once. no bull****.
if ur trainin ur ass of wit boxing - bags, pads, sparring, floorwork, med ball, etc. u will get way way stronger, losing weight or not, pound for pound u will be much strronger than the average weight lifter. i dono bout u, but i would rather be strong as a bull, then jus look strong as a bull.

yea everywhere i go everyone is always hangin off the meatheads dick, cuz they scared of him and all the girls are all over him and ****, but put that cat outside in the streets with me, and he'll jus be another meatball.....

boxing is the greatest workout in the world, period. but u CAN lift weights and box and be a fast, strong, powerful machine.

story of my life right there. Boxing is great for building p4p strength. Its such a good feelin being like half the size of some of those meat heads and puttin up the same as them

BrooklynBomber
09-11-2007, 02:48 PM
I just don't understand the obsession with excessive muscle size

I promise you, 90% of women prefer a guy with the physique of Roy Jones Jnr over a guy with the physique of Ronnie Coleman

To have a physique of Roy Jones Junior, you have to have excellent genetics and work out for many years. Boxing won't give you that.

2swell k-wells
09-11-2007, 03:31 PM
I think the real question is "is boxing worth the brain damage?"

SpeedKillz
09-11-2007, 04:39 PM
I think the real question is "is boxing worth the brain damage?"

u can get brain damage in football and mma jus the same as boxing. contact sports are dangerous and have risks associated with them, dont u know that? or r u jus secretly mad becuase the mma fad is dying down jus a smidget??

GrizzleBoy
09-11-2007, 04:58 PM
u can get brain damage in football and mma jus the same as boxing. contact sports are dangerous and have risks associated with them, dont u know that? or r u jus secretly mad becuase the mma fad is dying down jus a smidget??
Agreed.

I think the real question though, is what the thread starter thinks of as strength.

Being able to clean and jerk 500lbs one time is strength to one person, where as being able to swing your arms around with enough power to knock someone out for 12 rounds is strength for another person. I think it depends on what you think of as strength and which kind of strength you want.

2swell k-wells
09-11-2007, 05:27 PM
u can get brain damage in football and mma jus the same as boxing. contact sports are dangerous and have risks associated with them, dont u know that? or r u jus secretly mad becuase the mma fad is dying down jus a smidget??

mma dying down? dumb****, they still get more fans and ppv buys than boxing. go get your brain checked.

BrooklynBomber
09-11-2007, 05:48 PM
I think the real question is "is boxing worth the brain damage?"

Go play with someone else, you inbred *******.

SpeedKillz
09-11-2007, 09:17 PM
mma dying down? dumb****, they still get more fans and ppv buys than boxing. go get your brain checked.

ok i will, u wanna come with me?

arnoldming
09-12-2007, 05:30 AM
oh well, it all depends, hard to see it clearly

Lilian001
09-12-2007, 05:41 AM
Maybe it depends, but I think it worths

danny stash
09-12-2007, 11:01 PM
Nah MMA does not cause brain damage. It is the repeated dull blows rocking the brain over and over that causes the damage not the piercing KO's in street.

danny stash
09-12-2007, 11:03 PM
TO TSWELL K WELLS



just a question bud, why do you come on a boxing forum? Go to a MMA forum where you belong. This is BOXing scene..NOT mma scene..I dont give a **** about you and what you have to say if your gonna talk smack..
I always see your ass on here dissing boxing and boxers you are ****ing annoying....**** off kid

Golden-Gloves
09-13-2007, 01:13 AM
when I was lifting weights, I weighed 138 benching 225, I had a friend who weighed 190 pounds, who was only putting up 250, I had a much better ratio then him, I was much stronger then him for my size..

I now weigh 128, and probly cant even put up 175, but to tell you the truth I really dont give a ****...

Boxing isnt all about 'strength' if you ask me, it is about everything but strength, of course it comes into play, but its not the most important factor

Body Builders are all show, no go, Boxers are the opposite, we might not be cut or ****ing ripped, but 95% chance, yes I said 95% without exaggerating - we can probly knock out the guy bench pressing 350 right next to you

fraidycat
09-13-2007, 01:25 AM
I don't understand this thread.

I have been boxing for 18 months and although I've lost nearly 40 lbs., I've gained strength. And speed. And endurance. And explosive power.

But then, I lift weights AND box. :boxing:

Golden-Gloves
09-13-2007, 01:27 AM
So, you tell me, which is more important to you..

1) Being strong, looking badass

2) Or actually being a badass, able to knock out people 2 times bigger then you, who are actually body builders

fraidycat
09-13-2007, 02:04 AM
So, you tell me, which is more important to you..

1) Being strong, looking badass

2) Or actually being a badass, able to knock out people 2 times bigger then you, who are actually body builders

What makes you think that you have to choose?

EDIT: I am not trying to be an *******; I really want to know why you think you have to choose between being strong, looking badass, and being able to K people TFO. Lift (not bodybuild -- strength train) AND box, and you can do all of the above.

Banderivets
09-14-2007, 04:17 PM
Roy Jones and Wlad are great examples of what a boxer can look like, but they def have great genetics...

And it is true, a girl will go after a Roy Jones and a Wlad rather than some guy from WWF.

And for stregth........its all relative.

Just cause you lift a lot dont mean you can punch as hard.

Weight lifting is for "I lift furniture, refrigirators and 52" TVs" strength.

rellik13
09-14-2007, 04:57 PM
Started boxing last November. Before last November I was lifting weights 4-5 days a week for a couple years. After November maybe 3-6 times a month. I only lost 5 pounds in my incline dumbell press. I did however lose 110 pounds in my hammer strength decline press. I curl just slightly less. The losses are so small compared to the gains. Im so much faster, more agile, way more stamina and endurance and now have explosive power.

My favorite saying is one from LL Cool J. "Ill take a muscle bound punk and put his face in the sand". And that's how I feel everyday. I'll chop a muscle bound fool down with no hesitation. Chop Chop MF.

SpeedKillz
09-14-2007, 05:31 PM
Started boxing last November. Before last November I was lifting weights 4-5 days a week for a couple years. After November maybe 3-6 times a month. I only lost 5 pounds in my incline dumbell press. I did however lose 110 pounds in my hammer strength decline press. I curl just slightly less. The losses are so small compared to the gains. Im so much faster, more agile, way more stamina and endurance and now have explosive power.

My favorite saying is one from LL Cool J. "Ill take a muscle bound punk and put his face in the sand". And that's how I feel everyday. I'll chop a muscle bound fool down with no hesitation. Chop Chop MF.

thats how i feel as well, and my attitude reflects it. i'm not an ******* or anything, but usually, people know who **** with and not **** with by the look in their eye, and i havent been ****ed with since elementary school.... and its all thanks to the sweet science!! :boxing::boxing:

Golden-Gloves
09-14-2007, 06:46 PM
What makes you think that you have to choose?

EDIT: I am not trying to be an *******; I really want to know why you think you have to choose between being strong, looking badass, and being able to K people TFO. Lift (not bodybuild -- strength train) AND box, and you can do all of the above.

your taking it into the wrong content, if you were smart enough to read my post thoroughly, I was referring to body builders - spar with headgear on bud

the title of the thread is "is boxing worth the strength loss" - so assuming he doesnt do any other cardio type sport, Mma, Kung Fu ect - I'm assuming hes lifting weights, body building, therefor my statements were based on, bodybuilder vs. boxer

so in theory, the discussion would be about body building vs. boxing - of course, any boxer can look great, have a low body fat percentage, and decent amount of muscle, but plan to workout every single day for it, it wont come to some average joe who works out 2-3x a week