View Full Version : Want to start and get serious. 18y/o


c10d
03-06-2007, 05:37 PM
Ok guys I just made a long very informative thread and my computer decided to freeze up and I had to restart it and lost the whole thread before I could post it. So, I'm going to just cut right to the chase.

Info on me: 18years old, 5'6", 147lbs. I lift weights every other day usually, but my routine is focused on "functional" compound movements (flat bench, incline bench, deadlift, squat, weighted chin ups, weighted pullups, weighted dips, leg lifts, abdominal planks, weighted crunches, decline board twisting crunches,etc).

My dad, uncles, and grandfather are all ex-fighters. All of my dads friends for the most part are ex-fighters and ex-pro fighters. My dads freind who is an ex pro wants to train me. I've tried boxing before but only did it for a couple weeks because I was quickly overtrained. I wouldgo to the gym basically everyday and every heavy bag workout was high intensity and I'd also run in teh mornings. To sum it up, I know I overtrained because I started losing muscle mass, I was tired and groggy all the time, my sex drive was almost like nothing, I started gaining fat around the hip/thigh area, etc.

I also at this time was on a low carb diet so that probably contributed to the overtraining as well being that I probably had little to no liver and muscle glycogen.

I'm right handed, but honestly, standing unorthodox feels way more natural for me. I can move better and generate better punches. I'm pretty aggressive when i want to be so I guess that could be considered a good thing as well.

Basically I want to start boxing, but I dont want to end up overtraining. What advice can you give me about anything? ie the weightlifting, the overtraining, the switchstance, any other tips, too old to start?, etc etc etc.

Here's a few pics of me now. BTW I eat every 1-3 hrs and eat mainly clean foods. I take in approximately 3000 calories a day. My carb/prot/fat ratios now are approx 40/40/20.

http://img19.imageshack.us/img19/1179/img0063lilbrighterqv1.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

http://img19.imageshack.us/img19/587/skinnypigentst8.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

LoL don't mind the pose and heading in the 2nd pic

Southpaw16
03-06-2007, 07:40 PM
well, in terms of the overtraining, just eat a balanced diet, and when you are first first starting you don't want to be training everday. Even when you get experienced there should always be one day every week where you are doing no physical exercise.

I'm going to tell you one thing that you really need to take in if you want to become a successful boxer: boxing is a skill sport. You have to learn the craft, learn proper footwork, learn how to think in the ring. I can tell you come from a bit of a bodybuilding/general fitness enthusiast background. This is fine, and it is good to know about strength training and nutrition and stuff like that, but I see a lot of people coming from a similar background who don't understand what boxing is about. So this is one piece of advice I will give you, become a student of the game and learn your craft.

Boxing is about 80% skill, 20% strength and conditioning.

Verstyle
03-06-2007, 07:43 PM
well, in terms of the overtraining, just eat a balanced diet, and when you are first first starting you don't want to be training everday. Even when you get experienced there should always be one day every week where you are doing no physical exercise.

I'm going to tell you one thing that you really need to take in if you want to become a successful boxer: boxing is a skill sport. You have to learn the craft, learn proper footwork, learn how to think in the ring. I can tell you come from a bit of a bodybuilding/general fitness enthusiast background. This is fine, and it is good to know about strength training and nutrition and stuff like that, but I see a lot of people coming from a similar background who don't understand what boxing is about. So this is one piece of advice I will give you, become a student of the game and learn your craft.

Boxing is about 80% skill, 20% strength and conditioning.

naw man. pick that conditoning up higher. cause without that u dont have strength and your skill goes down a whole bunch.

IronNick
03-06-2007, 08:38 PM
nah, boxing is atleast 60 % skill, 40% strength and conditioning.

KanMan
03-06-2007, 09:40 PM
1% skill 1% talent 1% dicepline 97% mental

c10d
03-06-2007, 10:42 PM
well, in terms of the overtraining, just eat a balanced diet, and when you are first first starting you don't want to be training everday. Even when you get experienced there should always be one day every week where you are doing no physical exercise.

I'm going to tell you one thing that you really need to take in if you want to become a successful boxer: boxing is a skill sport. You have to learn the craft, learn proper footwork, learn how to think in the ring. I can tell you come from a bit of a bodybuilding/general fitness enthusiast background. This is fine, and it is good to know about strength training and nutrition and stuff like that, but I see a lot of people coming from a similar background who don't understand what boxing is about. So this is one piece of advice I will give you, become a student of the game and learn your craft.

Boxing is about 80% skill, 20% strength and conditioning.

Thanks for the reply.

I DO come from a fitness background and as much as it is good to know about nutrition and whatnot, sometimes I wish I didn't know as much as I did because I find myself analyzing everything little thing I eat and it actually puts a lot of stress on you mentally.

From what I hear from most other fighters I've talked to they basically say "eat lots of carbs. I eat a lot of pasta and oatmeal..."

I'm at a crossroad where I need to decide if I want to get into boxing or if I want to get into MMA. Boxing...I'd have the coach already (dads friend) and I'm sure my family would be 10000% supportive since they were mostly all boxers.

And what you said about the overtraining...that was my mistake right there...everyday I ran about 30mins early in the day...then trained that same day...everyday for a couple weeks...while also being on a restricted calorie diet...BOOM OVERTRAINED..LATERRR

c10d
03-07-2007, 12:07 AM
Thanks for the reply.

I DO come from a fitness background and as much as it is good to know about nutrition and whatnot, sometimes I wish I didn't know as much as I did because I find myself analyzing everything little thing I eat and it actually puts a lot of stress on you mentally.

From what I hear from most other fighters I've talked to they basically say "eat lots of carbs. I eat a lot of pasta and oatmeal..."

I'm at a crossroad where I need to decide if I want to get into boxing or if I want to get into MMA. Boxing...I'd have the coach already (dads friend) and I'm sure my family would be 10000% supportive since they were mostly all boxers.

And what you said about the overtraining...that was my mistake right there...everyday I ran about 30mins early in the day...then trained that same day...everyday for a couple weeks...while also being on a restricted calorie diet...BOOM OVERTRAINED..LATERRR

I'm sorry I forgot to put my question in there. Along with training with a qualified trainer, doing cardio, etc. I'd imagine I would eat a high calorie clean diet. Similar to my "bodybuilding" diet with the exception of I'd add in a lot more complex carbohydrates such as sweet potatos, whole wheat pastas/breads, veggies, oats, "healthy" cereals such as grape nuts/kashi/etc. Is this about right?

Now I could be wrong, but my body naturally (unless on a restricted diet) keeps most of my muscle, so even while doing all this cardio for boxing, as long as I get enough rest and enough calories from quality mostly 'natural' foods, I should keep a lot of strength while still gaining speed/technique/stamina

1_Punch_KO
03-07-2007, 09:10 AM
IMO, you can ease up on the diet. I use to count calories and all that junk but that takes away too much time reading labels and stuff...

best thing to do is to eat mainly organic foods.

because if you think about it too, boxing is a skill sport and diet doesn't change your skills. you might look better if you count calories and everything, but that doesnt mean youll be a better boxer

potatoes
03-07-2007, 12:55 PM
I'm sorry I forgot to put my question in there. Along with training with a qualified trainer, doing cardio, etc. I'd imagine I would eat a high calorie clean diet. Similar to my "bodybuilding" diet with the exception of I'd add in a lot more complex carbohydrates such as sweet potatos, whole wheat pastas/breads, veggies, oats, "healthy" cereals such as grape nuts/kashi/etc. Is this about right?

Now I could be wrong, but my body naturally (unless on a restricted diet) keeps most of my muscle, so even while doing all this cardio for boxing, as long as I get enough rest and enough calories from quality mostly 'natural' foods, I should keep a lot of strength while still gaining speed/technique/stamina




Internet forums are a good place to get caught up in side issues. If you want to be a boxer you should be a bit more concerned about learning to box. How many of these dirt-poor Mexicans spend their time worrying about complex carbohydrates? From what I have seen, most of them can fight like hell! :boxing:

esponda
03-07-2007, 06:17 PM
Internet forums are a good place to get caught up in side issues. If you want to be a boxer you should be a bit more concerned about learning to box. How many of these dirt-poor Mexicans spend their time worrying about complex carbohydrates? From what I have seen, most of them can fight like hell! :boxing:


dude , you'll better shut the **** up :nonono:

c10d
03-07-2007, 11:01 PM
Internet forums are a good place to get caught up in side issues. If you want to be a boxer you should be a bit more concerned about learning to box. How many of these dirt-poor Mexicans spend their time worrying about complex carbohydrates? From what I have seen, most of them can fight like hell! :boxing:

Ya know what man, you're absolutely right about the fact that I should be more concerned about learning to box rather than what my diet is like.

I think I'm so stuck on diet and what I eat because at one point I became (almost) anorexic and dealt with some psychological B.S. called "body dysmorphic disorder" and then while the whole bodybuilding deal helped get me out of it, my life still revolved around what I ate in a sense.

But ok guys enough of this girly talk. I made the choice, and this boy's boxing:boxing:

Time to up the cardio like whoa, start stretching a lot, and put my heart into this

j
03-08-2007, 12:41 AM
c10d,

welcome aboard.

i don't know how many people here are training boxing, or a similar craft, or are just repeating things they hear or read. so, as common sense would have it, listen to everything but be carefull in what or who you believe. i think this goes without saying though. having said that, some boxing forums(like this one in particular) are great places to chat about things like this. we do have some boxers here for sure - although i'm inclined to think that not everyone posting here is a boxer(myself, i practice chinese boxing) or has much experience in the craft or the sport part of it.

i have roughly 6 years of formal martial arts training starting from over a decade ago. i mention this because you seemed like you might also be interested in MMA. ahh - just reading your last post you seem to have decided upon boxing.

in general, boxing does seem to pay more. i haven't heard about many MMA guys who have made a couple million or more in a single year.

here's a link to some current salaries per fight from a wide range of ufc fighters:

http://www.themmaboards.com/showthread.php?t=886

first, my personal opinion on overtraining. i like the idea of training in various cycles. i don't feel it is necessary to train with an extremely high intensity every single day. try to "keep fresh" as i say. as a side note, i have found that more muscle building exercises will reduce your capabilities in sparring and boxing related drills. if you exercise in that way often, i would plan longer, harder/more intense boxing only training for days when you are not hitting the weights hard.

diet is important. your body can only make use of what you put into it. but as you said, don't let your research and concern with diet affect your training in boxing. i generally agree. also, feeling fit is more important than looking it - they are not always exclusive.


so formidable boxing skills are what you want to attain, heh? since your family is mostly boxers as you put it, sounds like you already have a strong base from which you can gather knowledge and advice from.

if you have some "old timers" in your family, you might want to pay particular attention to some things they say. a lot of the earlier twentieth century fighters seemed to me to have a stronger pound for pound punch - my great grandfather(a golden glover) was a tough bastard as well. boxing history, as i've studied it, seems to have a pattern that our earlier boxers had more creative boxing exercises. look into it.

keep me/us informed. i'd like to hear about your experiences as you progress through your training.