View Full Version : Is every KO a concussion?


BmoreBrawler
02-17-2007, 08:23 PM
Is a KO usually/always a concussion or not?

BrooklynBomber
02-17-2007, 08:31 PM
If the fighter is out, then yes.

PunchDrunk
02-17-2007, 08:58 PM
Not necessarily. When you're hit right on the chin, and your neck twists around, what happens is that the connection from the brain to the rest of the body (through the spine) is cut off (or disturbed). That's what you saw with Zab Judah, when he got knocked out by Kostya. He was sure he was okay, didn't feel a thing, but his head wasn't talking to his body, so he was all over the place like someone drunk out of his head. Being drunk isn't a concussion either, if you know what I'm saying.

PunchDrunk
02-17-2007, 09:00 PM
double post...

BmoreBrawler
02-17-2007, 09:48 PM
but generally, a KO is a concussion.

platinummatt!
02-17-2007, 10:12 PM
No, I dont think a KO is usually a concussion. And very little is known about the 2 things.

Exige Jr
02-17-2007, 10:15 PM
KO is like a slang term for a serious concussion.

BmoreBrawler
02-17-2007, 11:32 PM
Im still nursing a bad one(its been a month too). Didnt get knocked out though I did black out a little(3 rounds after the point where I probably got the concussion because thats when my memories fade). After seeing that thing on ESPN, Im not sure Id like to risk another one. People become depressed to the point of suicide from multiple concussions a la football players. It could be an alternate explanation to the excessive use of drugs by retired boxers other than "theyre from the streets.

American_Ninja
02-18-2007, 12:20 AM
You probably should see a DR.

Kid Achilles
02-18-2007, 02:09 AM
Boxing is not good for anyones brain but certain people are less susepctible to concussions than the rest of us. These people, more often than not, are the ones who stick around boxing long enough to develop the skills to become champions. You see a few rare people with glass chins who become champs but lets face it, 90% of world champions have a strong chin, way above the human average.

BigCol
02-18-2007, 02:16 AM
Boxing is not good for anyones brain but certain people are less susepctible to concussions than the rest of us. These people, more often than not, are the ones who stick around boxing long enough to develop the skills to become champions. You see a few rare people with glass chins who become champs but lets face it, 90% of world champions have a strong chin, way above the human average.

You are wrong in so many aspects. Boxers are TRAINED and CONDITIONED to take a punch.

Bendigo
02-18-2007, 03:27 AM
Man, this is scary ****. I mean, I love boxing, but I don't want to have slurred speech and other cerebral malfunctions when I'm 40. How much risk is involved in strictly amateur boxing??

PunchDrunk
02-18-2007, 07:52 AM
Man, this is scary ****. I mean, I love boxing, but I don't want to have slurred speech and other cerebral malfunctions when I'm 40. How much risk is involved in strictly amateur boxing??

Not such a big risk. Depends on your number of fights, level of opposition, style of fighting etc.

I've never been the on to take one to get one, and people can't see I've boxed at all, except for a couple of scars from cuts. No flat nose or anything. On the other hand, I trained a kid, who was pretty much and old man, boxing wise, when he was 22. He had a straight forward never say die style, where he'd take anything thrown at him, to get in and deliver. He had 75 fights, I have 88. So style and ability means a lot.

BmoreBrawler
02-18-2007, 11:01 AM
You are wrong in so many aspects. Boxers are TRAINED and CONDITIONED to take a punch.

lol. What training exactly goes into this besides neck excercises which most boxers dont do anyway?

BmoreBrawler
02-18-2007, 11:03 AM
Man, this is scary ****. I mean, I love boxing, but I don't want to have slurred speech and other cerebral malfunctions when I'm 40. How much risk is involved in strictly amateur boxing??

well, Im not as experienced as a lot of the people here, but consider this. They have KO's in the Amateurs(somewhat rare I guess, though when ppl on this board post their records they make themselves sound like mike tyson), and in most cases they are volume KO's. Always more dangerous than the one shot wonder.

Exige Jr
02-18-2007, 11:45 AM
lol. What training exactly goes into this besides neck excercises which most boxers dont do anyway?
Sparring................

Trick
02-18-2007, 12:01 PM
The reality is obviously that your brain is better off without boxing... But that's the price you pay, and besides, the only concussion I've ever gotten was in soccer, not boxing. According to the amateur association, less than 1% of amateur fights end in KOs (this does not include TKO), which basically means that a fighter is almost never counted out to 10 seconds. Either he loses on points, or the ref steps in as soon as he thinks it's all goin' downhill. It does also depend on style and all that. Honestly, ya, know that it's not so good for your brain. But just keep it at that, if you step through the ropes thinkin' of all these risks, your knees I'll turn to jelly.

Peace,
Trick

BmoreBrawler
02-18-2007, 12:16 PM
Sparring................

oh please. You might be psychologically more used to taking a punch but physically? Are you building muscles on the brain stem? :nono:

Exige Jr
02-18-2007, 01:23 PM
oh please. You might be psychologically more used to taking a punch but physically? Are you building muscles on the brain stem? :nono:
According to Manny Steward... yes.

PunchDrunk
02-18-2007, 01:29 PM
oh please. You might be psychologically more used to taking a punch but physically? Are you building muscles on the brain stem? :nono:

Oh, please, what? Are you saying mental strength means nothing in boxing? The kind of attitude you take a punch with is just as important as any physical attribute.

Pork Chop
02-18-2007, 02:46 PM
I've already brought this up a few times, but i'll say it again.

i've known guys who showed signs of slurred speech, stuttering, and slowed mental processing before they ever fought a single amateur fight.

A lot of the wear and tear on a boxer's brain can happen in the gym.

Train hard, spar smart, fight smart.

GR@Y SKIEZ
02-18-2007, 03:19 PM
who gives a **** about a concussion..worry about it when and if you get one..until then dont think about the negative effects of boxing, jus think about the positives....

and really, a concussion is that big of a deal...and neither is a broken nose, a broken hand, or stitches...its not the end of the world...or the end of your boxing days...

BmoreBrawler
02-18-2007, 08:19 PM
Oh, please, what? Are you saying mental strength means nothing in boxing? The kind of attitude you take a punch with is just as important as any physical attribute.

well theres no doubt about that, I think we all know that the desire to go down follows every blow, but actually getting KTFO is a scientific phenomena, not psychological.

BmoreBrawler
02-18-2007, 08:20 PM
Oh, please, what? Are you saying mental strength means nothing in boxing? The kind of attitude you take a punch with is just as important as any physical attribute.

According to Manny Steward... yes.

neck muscles yeah, not inside the skull.

Kid Achilles
02-18-2007, 08:40 PM
If you have a glass chin, there's nothing you can do about it and I don't care how courageous you are, if you're out you're out. As for knockouts being largely psychological, Oliver McCall had no will to fight Lewis in their rematch yet absorbed his punches like they were nothing.

Sure the will to fight plays a role but some people just can't take a punch, period, and they have no control over it.

BmoreBrawler
02-18-2007, 09:10 PM
Sure the will to fight plays a role but some people just can't take a punch, period, and they have no control over it.

I agree, and thats my excuse :) While I took a ****load of punches(probably 100+ in 4 rounds) in heavy sparring I never went down thought my body wanted too. However, I think I was predisposed to get a concussion, which I got in the first round. Good chin, weak brain?

shawn_
02-20-2007, 08:25 PM
If you are taking 20+ clean punches to the head each round while sparing, you should seriously consider working on your defensive skills before you step back in the ring.

BmoreBrawler
02-20-2007, 08:39 PM
If you are taking 20+ clean punches to the head each round while sparing, you should seriously consider working on your defensive skills before you step back in the ring.

good call. Unfortunately the double end bag really doesnt cut actual training which my trainers didnt feel like doing.

GR@Y SKIEZ
02-20-2007, 10:54 PM
good call. Unfortunately the double end bag really doesnt cut actual training which my trainers didnt feel like doing.

what do you mean by that? it doesnt cut actual training?

BmoreBrawler
02-20-2007, 10:57 PM
doesnt CUT IT COMPARED TO actual training, im sorry. Must be the concussion talking :)

GR@Y SKIEZ
02-20-2007, 11:04 PM
oooooh..haha...ok i gotcha..

instead of sparring alot, you should have your trainer work the pads with you everyday and just focus mainly on your defense..spar maybe once a week, and the other days just do defense drills, until you get really sharp with your defense....then start sparring more often.