Bookmark Website  | Free Registration  | The Team
The Lounge  | Champions  | The Wire |  Schedule |  Audio  |  Arcade  |  The Top Ten  |  Historical  |  Email  |  Video

Muscle On The Brain

"A six-week cycle's gonna cost ya $170, lady -- you wanna knowhow to use 'em?"

This was the bit of flotsam I picked up in the interest of leaning what families with teen boys face during last week's National Family Week focus on family fitness and health.

Call it the afterglow of the Summer Olympics or an offshoot ofExtreme Makeover, or; heck, it could be the impact of Hollywoodstars and singers with sexy six-packs.

Whatever the reason, kids who were raised on the best of healthand fitness intentions are willing to do scary things to their bodies you taught them were temples.

While some are athletes and eager to improve their strength andskills, many are not, seeking only to look more adult. For bothgroups, faster is better.

So what do you do if the boy at your house is longing to be bigger and bader and is willing to tell you that even though some of his friends do steroids, he wants to try protein powders -- at $300. a month -- or "um, maybe, steroids because I know where to get them." If your teen will talk about any of this, consider yourself ahead of the game, said Scott Wooding, author of the best seller "Rage, Rebellion & Rudeness: Parenting Teenagers in the New Millennium."

"Kids have no patience. They're not good at looking ahead. Theydon't recognize the years of work a strong athletic body takes nor that steroids or supplements are generally not the reason for the bulk," said Wooding, a psychologist.

Do the research. Go on the Web, together. It doesn't take long -- past the first 500 hits for supplement suppliers -- to read news stories of the questionable purity, safety and effectiveness of protein powders and creatine serums and the potentially long-lasting and life-threatening effects of steroids.

And then pay close attention, Wooding says. "If your kid is bulking up too fast, it's not from weightlifting. Weights will give definitions, that "ripped" quality they like, but it doesn't add bulk at all quickly."

Kelly Anne Erdman, a registered dietitian at the University of Calgary's Sport Medicine Center, says the desire for a quick fix is a common problem for adolescents.

"They're generally 12 to 16, particularly swimmers and hockey players," she said. "And yes, they're mostly males."

The inability to achieve body mass is purely biological, Erdman said. "The bones are growing first, and the muscles have to catch up."

Between ages 12 and 16, a boy gains a whopping 22 to 27 kilograms(50 to 60 pounds) and that's just the average.

"It is a problem for them to make up calories lost to their regular daily needs for energy plus the calorie-burning needs of their sport -- plus they're still growing," said Erdman, who notes 500 to 1,000 extra calories a day is necessary for these boys.

"It takes time, and that's why they're tempted by supplement claims." While the problem with steroids is well documented -- mood swings, rages and suicidal thoughts and attempts, not to mention the cheating this represents -- the dietitian noted the problems with supplements stem from what is not know. "Unknown are the undeclared ingredients, not always listed and not always pure."

By contrast, the home solution is as simple as a bag of dry skim milk powder -- which includes whey, the protein from cow's milk. It's not only one of the best sources of protein, Erdman said, it has "bio-availability," that allows it to be processed readily by the body.

Erdman said counseling with a registered dietitian goes a long way with teens and young adults to help them assess current eating habits, personal goals for growth and sports and develop a nutrition plan.

But much can be done at home, too: "Encourage the teen to eat sixtimes a day. Eat frequently."

Make sure meals are naturally juiced with nutrient-dense fresh fruits, vegetables, whole grains, dairy products and a variety of protein sources.

And let them know what's normal, Wooding said. "It's slow and steady and takes months and years to produce. That's why working out and physical exercise is recommended for older teens, both genders, to build their muscles."

For many teen boys, this will be just another phase, and that bucket of supplement powder will be emptied in favor of a big, bad stash of magazines. But that's another story.

Author: Susan Rutter -- Publisher, Nutritionist, and Instructor who assists patients and the public make healthy choices and changes in their lives. Web Site: Healthy YOUbbies

Contact Email:

Complimentary Email Course: "Diet Is Only A Four Letter Word".


The News Journal

Build muscle, power with new intense workout BrickFit
The News Journal
The origins of BrickFit are quite simple. The new fitness routine, crafted by longtime Delaware health and exercise guru Dino Sclavounos, draws from high-intensity exercise routines and Sclavounos' love of Ironman competitions. Those triathalons ...


#360fit: How much protein do you need to build muscle?
How much protein does the body really need to build muscle? What happens if you take too much or too little? Protein is essential for recovery and growth and we examine just how much protein you really need to build the muscle you work so hard to gain.

The Cheat Sheet

The Best Ways to Build Muscle
The Cheat Sheet
The following tips will help you make the most of your time spent at the gym or otherwise so that you can build muscle fast. First, it's important to analyze your food intake — this includes calories you're taking in and what foods you're getting ...

and more »

The Sport Review

Branched chain amino acids: Can BCAAs help to build muscle at the gym?
The Sport Review
Branched chain amino acids: Can consuming BCAAs help to build muscle at the gym? We asked a leading sports scientist for his take. 9BAR. By 9BAR Sunday 22 November 2015, 12:07 UK. 41SHARES. BCAA gym. BCAAs are available in both tablet and ...

The Sport Review

The top nutrition tips for gym goers looking to build muscle
The Sport Review
Leading sports scientist and 9BAR ambassador Greg Whyte gives his top nutrition tips for gym goers looking to build muscle. Greg says: Train hard. There are no shortcuts to increasing muscle mass. You must stress the muscle through exercise to induce ...

and more »

The Cheat Sheet

5 Treadmill Workouts That Burn Fat and Build Muscle
The Cheat Sheet
No matter how negatively you feel about it, the treadmill is one of the most effective gym tools for torching calories and building endurance. Even die-hard runners don't much care for running in place. Maybe it's because a treadmill run has a way of ...

The Cheat Sheet

How to Build Muscle Without Gaining Fat
The Cheat Sheet
There is a myth that you have to gain fat to gain muscle, but it's just not true. Many men and women are turned off from the benefits of strength training because they don't want to bulk up. However, with a few techniques and diet modifications, there ...

The Medium

How skinny guys build muscle & how to say “No!” to sweets
The Medium
You may be a genetic ectomorph—in other words, “thin”—but want to be a genetic mesomorph, where your biceps bulge out of your shirt like an inflated balloon. Even though your lean physique will likely stay with you for the rest of your life, there's ...


5 Ways to Lose Weight in a Hurry
... from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Researchers say that since strength workouts build muscle in addition to burning fat, they can increase your metabolism over the long term to keep you losing weight even when you're sitting at ...


Motivation Monday: Bodyweight v. Weighted Workouts
GOLDEN VALLEY, Minn.- Fitness expert Chris Freytag knows you want your workouts to count. If you are sweating, there better be payoff. Both bodyweight moves or weighted exercises will help you get fit quicker. They both build muscle. So in order to ...

Google News


Section Site Map - Submit News - Feedback - Comments - Advertise with Us

Copyright LLC. All rights reserved.